As an organization committed to living the value of Compassion, ChooseWell has been faithful to our promise to:

  • Be present to suffering – in ourselves and in others – For more than three years now, ChooseWell has faithfully journeyed with young families affected by the disease of addiction.  We are privileged to bear witness to the suffering caused by this disease – not just to the families, but to the front-line care providers and the broader community who yearn for better outcomes for those who struggle.  We are honored to carry the stories of more than 100 women who are orchestrating their families’ lives as best they can while working to break the grip of addiction and the stigma associated with it.prayer-flag-2
  • Remain lovingly curious about the root causes of that suffering – We are working to overcome our own judgment, fear and frustration surrounding the missed potential and perceived waste of human and financial resources caused by an unmanageable disease.  We love the families and the “system” so much that we have no choice but to remain “compassionate disruptors” while we question and wonder what might be possible if Compassion was truly the driving force behind our community’s response to this challenge.
  • To do little things with great love to alleviate suffering –  We just can’t stop!  Fueled by the insights and dreams of the families themselves, we show up every day to imagine, innovate, experiment, slip up and try again to build clearer pathways for thriving WITH the families who have shared so much with us.

 

WHAT WE’VE LEARNED:

mary-babyINFANTS’ BRAIN DEVELOPMENT is affected by their environment and early experiences.

THE FIRST YEAR OF RECOVERY is the most demanding in terms of relapse prevention.

ENVIRONMENTAL/SOCIAL CONDITIONS are the most significant determinants of health outcomes.

SUBSTANCE MISUSE IN HOMES is a leading cause of adverse childhood experiences (ACES).

THE PREVALENCE OF SUBSTANCE MISUSE IN HOMES WITH INFANTS (in Louisville) CANNOT BE IGNORED – In 2015 alone, more than 700 infants were treated for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) in Louisville hospitals – this is the equivalent of 30 KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOMS filled with children whose family story includes substance misuse.

WE HAVE SEEN HOW THE POWER OF A COMPASSIONATE, FAMILY-CENTERED, COMMUNITY RESPONSE can ignite solutions and inspire change.

PLEASE JOIN US!